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June 30th, 2015

164_Mic_AImagine a world where you no longer rely on passwords. What would it look like? Would there be flying cars speeding through the skies? Would there be robots serving you coffee in Starbucks? While these two changes are still probably decades away, a password-free world is not. Here’s how Microsoft Windows 10 is taking the first steps to eliminating passwords now.

The problem with passwords

The problem with passwords is simple - they can be stolen. And from Facebook to iTunes to Flickr and thousands more, nearly every major website and thousands of niche ones require a password to use. And because we Internet users are logging onto dozens of these sites and services everyday, it’s virtually impossible for us to create a unique, complex password for each one. So people resort to using only a handful of passwords, or even just one master password, since it’s easier. But of course, this poses a security risk. So what’s an Internet user to do?

Microsoft Windows 10 is pioneering a new technology that is ready to flip this dated system on its head and eliminate the password problem for good.

Login to your devices with biometrics

Passwords can be stolen easily, but how easy is it to steal a person’s physicality? Microsoft’s new technology, named Hello, uses biometrics - such as your fingerprint, or face or iris scan - to log into your computer, laptop or other device. This ensures that no one can login to your device but you.

Well, what about using a photograph to login instead, you might ask? It won’t work. Using technology that takes a detailed map of your face in 3D, Hello is trained to reject the token photograph or selfie on login attempt. This makes it virtually impossible for anyone, besides you, to login to your device.

Use biometrics to login on the web

Logging into your computer with biometrics is great, but what most users really want is a more secure solution to login to websites while not having to remember a bazillion passwords. This is where Microsoft’s Passport comes in. Passport allows you to login into applications and online content without the need for a password. For example, instead of using your typical password to sign into your Microsoft Windows Account, you can now use Windows 10 facial recognition (or other biometrics) to log you in instead. That means you can access Skype, Xbox Live, Office 365 and more without a standard password. In addition to your Microsoft Windows Account, you’ll be able to use the biometric capabilities of Passport to access thousands of enterprise Azure Active Directory online services. Bear in mind, though, that it will be quite some time before you can use Passport to replace all your standard logins, since not every website has implemented this technology yet.

Want to hear more exciting Windows 10 news, or need assistance with your Windows device? Get in touch with one of our technology experts today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

June 29th, 2015

Windows_Jun18_AIt’s finally here - the long-awaited release of the new Windows 10 operating system from Microsoft has been confirmed for July 29. The tech giant is skipping number 9, making this the latest release since Windows 8 failed to live up to expectations. That means Microsoft has gone back to the drawing board, and emerged with countless impressive features. If you’re ready to get started with Windows 10 this summer, here’s what you need to know.

You can get it for free

They say the best things in life are free, and that might just be the case with Windows 10. Microsoft has kept its word about making its newest operating system free to access - at least if you’re currently running an authentic version of Windows 7 or 8.1, its two most recent releases. You’ll enjoy a free lifetime upgrade to Windows 10 provided you make the move within the next year and, better still, it’s an automatic upgrade directly from your existing Windows 7 or 8.1 interface. If you’re running an older version of Windows, you’ll need to make a fresh install and you’ll also need to pay - the various available versions of Windows 10 are expected to retail starting at $119.

It’s being launched in phases

Although the official release date is July 29, in reality Microsoft is expected to undertake a phased launch. This means that you might not end up using the brand new Windows 10 on July 29 itself - instead, Microsoft is likely to make the new operating system available to desktop and laptop users first, and only later to mobile and other devices. What’s more, the firm already has its next move in the pipeline. Upgrade and update plans for Windows 10 are anticipated to be on the way in two phases, in June and October 2016. But we are expecting these changes, codenamed Redstone, to come in the form of more minor tweaks to the Windows 10 infrastructure rather than a full overhaul.

It’s the last you’ll see of Windows

Microsoft has made no secret of the fact that it sees Windows 10 as the operating system’s final release. But that’s not quite as ultimate as it sounds - this is not really the end of Windows. Instead, what we’re seeing is the transition of Windows from a product to a service. Microsoft envisions a future where, instead of major new versions of Windows emerging every few years, there are regular improvements and updates - far beyond the WIndows Updates that we know at the moment.

It’s likely that version numbers will come to play far less of a role in system updates in the future - in much the same way as mobile apps operate, we’ll instead settle into enjoying a frequently updated service that incorporates the latest features Microsoft has developed. And while some have expressed fears that this could lead to home and business users being tied into a subscription model in order to stay up to date, Microsoft appears committed to ensuring that ongoing upgrades are free.

Ready to make the leap to Windows 10? Want to find out how best to make the transition with minimal disruption to your business? Give us a call and let us walk you through it.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

June 29th, 2015

BusinessContinuity_Jun25_AData backup is one of the most important aspects of your company's infrastructure. Without data availability, your business will come to a standstill. So it's bizarre that most business owners fail to have a proper data backup strategy in place - and when disasters strike, it will be too late to act. You really do need to take a proactive approach to backing up your data and keeping your business functioning normally at all times. There are several methods and devices you can use for backing up data - here are some to consider.

There’s no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to data backups. You’ll want to consider the pros and cons of each of the backup devices below before making a purchase.

USB stick

USB flash drives are basically miniature hard drives that you connect to your computer using a USB port. The drives are extremely cheap, with prices depending on their capacity. They’re also portable, and can be used to backup information from several computers to the same drive.

Although USB sticks are highly convenient, they’re still not a complete backup solution, and are best suited for intermediate backups, such as storing file recovery programs or critical business documents.

External hard drive

An external hard drive is perfect when used as backup storage media. It has the lowest cost per gigabyte when compared to the other backup devices out there. External hard drives use the same plug-and-play functionality as USB sticks, so you can plug the drive into your computer and immediately start selecting the files you want to backup. The transfer rate is also very fast, and you can backup a large amount of data within seconds.

One of the evident drawbacks of using an external hard drive is that you’ll need to update your backups on a regular basis, or else new files won’t be included. There’s also the risk of the device being stolen or misused. For instance, a colleague may take your drive when you’re away from your desk, or a disgruntled employee may copy all of your important business files and take it with them when quitting.

Network attached storage

Network attached storage, or NAS for short, is a dedicated device with its own IP address. It can be used as a multimedia server, and can function as an email or lightweight database server. NAS offers data redundancy, meaning it will generate a backup of your backups, so you can ensure your files are fully protected.

The main downside of NAS is its inability to scale beyond the limits of the system; you have to purchase additional hard drive bays when you need more capacity. You also have to take full responsibility for data security if you’re implementing NAS.

Cloud storage

Cloud storage is becoming more and more popular among businesses of all sizes, due to its many benefits such as allowing users to access data anywhere on smartphone devices, as well as enabling you to work with the most current hardware and up-to-date software. It is also affordable, since you’ll only have to pay for what you use. What’s more, cloud computing is very convenient, because your service provider will take care of the installation, management, and maintenance processes.

On the downside, some cloud service providers don’t employ sufficient security measures on their systems, so your data could be exposed to potential cybersecurity threats. This means that it is not always the ideal solution for companies dealing with very sensitive data - medical practices and law firms, for example. Predicting costs can also be hard; if your business is growing rapidly, then you might find you have not adequately planned for incremental costs.

Choosing the best system for backup is a critical decision that will impact your business on a daily basis. There are trade-offs among backup devices, which is why you need to choose the solution - or solutions - best suited to your business. Contact us today and our experts will assess your company’s needs and provide the best backup solutions for you.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

June 26th, 2015

GoogleApps_Jun5_AIf you’re a Google Calendar user and you currently rely on the service’s text message notifications to keep your life in order, it’s time to start rethinking your scheduling habits - because Google is about to flick the power switch on those alerts for most users. As of June 27, Google Calendar will no longer send SMS notifications of upcoming events, and your choice of notification will be reduced to an email, a popup dialog on your desktop, or a smartphone or tablet notification. Here’s what you need to know.

Google says that, in 2015, SMS notifications of upcoming diary engagements are no longer needed. It’s true that you no longer even need an internet connection on your phone or tablet in order to receive alerts.

With Google’s announcement, if you currently use SMS notifications then you’ll instead see pop-up notifications on your mobile or desktop device. These only function on mobile devices if you have a calendar app installed - either Google Calendar or a rival app native to your device - and on desktop devices if you have the web version of Google Calendar running in your browser.

If you’re not already a smartphone user, the transition is less simple - and now might be the time to make the move to a smartphone. The alternative is to manually switch your SMS notifications out for email alerts within the settings for individual events, both recurring ones and those that you create going forward. But bear in mind that, without an internet-connected smartphone, you won’t have access to email notifications of event alterations while you’re on the move.

If you are using a corporate Google account designed for education, government or business, you’re safe - for now, support continues for SMS notifications for users of these services. But if you rely on a personal account to power your Google Calendar scheduling, you’ll need to adapt to the change in time for the June 27 switchover.

Want to learn more about using Calendar and other Google apps to streamline your personal and business lives? Give us a call and see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

June 26th, 2015

HealthcareEMRGeneral_June15_AGovernment officials are determined to see that every healthcare institution has electronic medical record (EMR) systems, but many physicians are still reluctant to implement them. While EMR possess many useful features to help streamline healthcare processes, some people find the whole system overly complex and feel that they could take good care of patients even without it. But when implemented properly, EMR serves as a great tool to preserve critical medical information and increase workflow efficiency. With that said, there are a number of challenges that you need to overcome if you want to reap the full benefits of EMR.

Challenge #1: EMR is breaking your budget

It’s no secret that the cost of purchasing and installing EMR is huge. This includes hardware, software, implementation assistance, training, support, and ongoing network fees. In fact, the cost of EMR is the number one reason why many healthcare institutions haven’t yet made the switch. But the benefits of EMR are numerous, and greatly outweigh the cost of implementation. If you find EMR costs to be beyond your budget, you should make a thorough assessment of your needs, and consult with vendors to develop economical EMR solutions.

Challenge #2: EMR doesn’t fit with workflow

Some medical institutions may find that, even after careful planning and implementation, EMR just doesn’t provide the functionality they need. Imagine a scenario where you have invested a substantial amount of money in the technology, but are unable to use it to its fullest potential. Yet you can avoid this problem by putting more time into the planning process. Instead of making rushed decisions, ask potential vendors to provide an in-depth demonstration of the features and functions of EMR. It’s also wise to have your physicians and staff test-drive it, and provide some feedback, prior to the purchase.

Challenge #3: Training employees is difficult

Scheduling EMR training sessions for your employees can be a challenging feat, given the amount of work they already have to contend with on a day-to-day basis. The whole program might even be overwhelming to them, so much so that they shut their minds to the training completely. The solution is to designate key employees who are prepared to dedicate their time and effort to get to know all about EMR, and who can serve as ambassadors for the technology and as a resource for physicians and other staff members.

Challenge #4: Physicians resist using EMR

Some physicians simply refuse to accept new technology, either because they don’t believe in its capabilities, they’re convinced that their way of doing things can produce better results, or perhaps because they’re intimidated by it. Once again, you need to identify a superuser who can encourage others to adopt EMR and feel more comfortable about it. A peer-to-peer approach will work best in this situation.

Challenge #5: EMR doesn’t meet Meaningful Use requirements

It’s hard to keep up with regulations, and in particular the requirements to comply with Meaningful Use. Sometimes even vendors fall behind, which means you risk facing penalties for not meeting obligations. The best way to address this is to assign someone to communicate with vendors regarding Meaningful Use requirements and deadlines, so you don’t miss a step.

If you’re looking to implement EMR in your healthcare business, get in touch with us today and we can support you from planning right through to implementation.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

June 23rd, 2015

164_browsers_AIf you’re like most internet users, you probably use Google Chrome, Firefox or Opera as your web browser of choice. But later this year, there will be a new player in the game. It’s called Edge, and Microsoft’s technologically advanced wonder child may just be the browser of choice for the next generation.

With Windows 10 launching later this year, Microsoft has a new browser packaged with it. Formerly known as Project Spartan, you can test out a beta version of this browser as part of the Windows Insider Program. But if you’re not ready to jump on the bandwagon and try it just yet, here are three reasons why the world is getting excited about Edge.

1. Speedy browsing

A major reason Internet Explorer made surfing the web as slow as a tortoise was the support of legacy technologies such as ActiveX, Browser Helper Objects and others. Now, without the excess baggage, Edge is operating at a speed eons better than its predecessor. What may come as even more of a surprise is the fact that in recent tests it also outperformed both Chrome and Firefox in terms of speed.

2. Features, features, and more features

There are tons of cool features Edge offers that are sure to get anyone excited. From the Reading View function that allows you to view content without any ads, to the Annotation feature that enables you to write notes on a web page and share them with friends or colleagues, Microsoft appears to be set on pushing boundaries and wow-ing users with their focus on the future of internet browsing.

3. There will be extensions

If you love the extensions that Google and Firefox have on offer, you can let out a long sigh of relief. Microsoft Edge will have extension capabilities as well. And even better, you can “steal” extensions from Chrome and Firefox and use them on Edge too. Bear in mind, however, that extensions will not be available right away.

Is Edge the real deal?

While it may have felt like the creators of Internet Explorer were spending more time napping than updating their browser for the 21st century, this appears not to be the case with Edge. In a recent post on the Windows blog, the Microsoft Edge team wrote that “improving performance is a never ending theme” when referring to Windows 10. It seems Microsoft is now committed to staying current, which didn’t really feel true with Internet Explorer.

Want to learn more about Microsoft Edge and other browsers? Curious to discover the best browser for your business? Let’s talk. Call us today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Browsers
June 22nd, 2015

Hardware_Jun11_AFor keen users of Apple technology across the globe, the technology giant’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) is the event to watch for news of the company’s latest projects and upcoming releases. This year’s WWDC took place earlier this month in San Francisco, with the keynote speech giving a rundown of what Apple has on the cards in the months and years to come. Here are the big takeaways you should be aware of.

New operating systems

The big news from the WWDC was about operating systems. Apple took the opportunity to unveil three new releases - for mobile devices, Mac desktops and laptops, and the Apple Watch. Access to all three has been given to developers as of now, with public beta testing and full availability expected to follow later in the year.

iOS

On the mobile front, iOS 9 ups the ante on intelligence, with a focus on allowing devices to learn more about our behavior and so tailor the user experience to suit. At the root of these improvements are upgrades to both Siri and search; expect mobile devices running iOS 9 to be better at launching apps before you realize you need them - great for productivity - and reminding you about (and getting you to) upcoming meetings and appointments. Among other changes, upgrades to the iPad will enable enhanced productivity and multitasking, great news for the hurried business user who needs to make the most of the time available.

OS X

The desktop and laptop operating system upgrade to OS X 10.11 is seen as a stepping stone from Yosemite rather than an entirely new approach - but it’s a significant upgrade all the same. Among the most exciting developments are search improvements that will allow you to use natural language when you’re on the hunt for important information and files; likewise, the release is intended to make multitasking across windows even more of a breeze. The productivity and communication apps most commonly used by our business clients - the likes of Mail, Safari and Notes - have also been tuned up both in terms of visible features and behind-the-scenes upgrades to their running speed and overall performance.

watchOS

Finally, though the Apple Watch might not yet be at the stage of being a game-changer on the office productivity scene, the second release of its operating system lays the way for an enhanced user experience. watchOS 2 will, most crucially, lessen the requirement for you to use your iPhone alongside your watch - one of the notable drawbacks when the watch came on sale - and instead allow the device to do more, and run more apps, on its own.

Apple also used WWDC to reveal details of improvements to Apple Maps that will see the service include transit information for cities including San Francisco, New York and London - making it easier for you to get to your meeting on time if you’re taking public transportation. Equally exciting is the news that Apple Pay continues to grow; the mobile payment system is being rolled out to more and more retailers across the US, and is making the jump across the pond to the United Kingdom, where it’s being rolled out in banks, stores and on public transportation.

Want to learn more about the latest Apple technology developments, and how you can put them to use to drive greater efficiency in your business? Talk to our helpful team today.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Apple Mac OS
June 19th, 2015

BusinessIntelligence_Jun9_ACompanies today are adopting business intelligence (BI) tools to represent data in a way that makes information comprehension and analysis simple. But all too often business owners make mistakes in selecting and implementing a BI software solution, resulting in unnecessarily high costs and ineffective execution. To help, we have put together the most common BI mistakes organizations make, and how to avoid them.

Mistake #1: Not defining business problems

One of the biggest mistakes in BI implementation is jumping to conclusions too soon without first identifying what your business wants to accomplish. When it comes to integrating BI into business operations, there’s no such thing as a one-size-fits-all solution. Looking for a single BI tool to solve all analytics problems is one of the main reasons many BI projects fail.

You need to clearly define the business problem you’re trying to solve, and understand the specific tools required to solve those problems. Only then will you be able to select and purchase the BI tool that best suits your needs.

Mistake #2: Not getting buy-in from end users

Even the best BI tools are ineffective if they’re not properly utilized. Forcing your employees to use newly purchased BI technology without informing them or hearing their thoughts beforehand is a big mistake.

Instead of telling employees they have to use something, first focus on highlighting the benefits of the new BI system. Help employees understand why they’ll want to use it, and convince them by showing them what they stand to gain from the new BI technology.

Mistake #3: Rushing implementation

A rushed deployment of new technology is often times not a successful one. When it comes to deploying BI solutions, patience is key. If you hurry into BI implementation too quickly, your end users may not have enough time to develop the skills required to use the software effectively.

Take an incremental approach to implementing BI solutions. Make a list identifying business problems and, rather than expecting to solve every business problem all at once, try to prioritize specific outcomes you want to achieve. When you have solved the first issue, move on to the next one and so on until you have incrementally solved all the problems on the list.

Mistake #4: Insufficient training

New BI systems are complex structures that require a lot of training in order for users to make the most of them. If users lack the skills necessary to operate the software, then bottlenecks can occur. The product may be left dormant for long periods of time as users wait for experienced IT staff to resolve teething problems.

Spend wisely on providing ongoing training, so that users really understand how to use the system. Consider hosting weekly lunch sessions where a different aspect of the BI system is discussed. You could also provide online training videos that enable users to learn more about the new system at their own pace.

Mistake #5: Not making use of information and reports

BI tools are designed to analyze raw data and turn it into valuable information that can be used in business decision making. But some organizations fail to exploit the information fully - it is not shared, not analyzed, and not acted on. BI software can generate reports on various data points, identify risks, and predict trends. It’s important to leverage the information gathered and to apply it to your business’s objectives and goals.

Business intelligence software is a highly useful tool that, when used properly, can drive your business forward. Avoid these mistakes in order to make the most of your BI solutions. If you’re looking to implement BI tools to your company, contact our experienced consultants today and see how we can help.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

June 18th, 2015

Office365_Jun4_AEmail plays a huge part in the average day of the modern business person, but it’s easy to see how many of us get overloaded. The sheer number of messages we now receive through email is enough to prove a distraction from our real jobs. And for all the tips we might read on how to block out email-free periods of our day, or unsubscribe from unwanted newsletters, somehow the trash keeps coming. Even setting aside spam, much of the email we receive just isn’t the kind of thing we need to deal with right away. Outlook’s new Clutter feature, recently rolled out to all users, can help you fight your inbox nightmares.

Originally announced at Microsoft’s Exchange Conference at the start of 2014, the Clutter add-on for Outlook began rolling out last November to Office 365 business customers who had signed up for the first release. During the initial trial period for Clutter, the function was disabled by default - now that’s been changed, and as of June 15 the tool was due to be turned on by default for all Office 365 users.

At the heart of Clutter is a desire to prioritize email, and move less important messages from your inbox so that you can review and deal with them at your convenience. With only your highest priority emails waiting for you in your main inbox, the idea is that you enjoy fewer distractions and so enhance productivity in your real job - which, for most of us, isn’t email at all. Clutter is an intelligent tool, meaning it picks up hints on which emails are important to you based both on the type of the message and how you are addressed in it. It also uses the Office Graph social feature to track your prior actions both within the Outlook Web App and on Outlook clients for desktop and mobile devices.

Messages identified as lower priority are whisked away to a specific Clutter folder for you to review when you have the chance. Alternatively, you can simply choose to ignore the messages, treating the Clutter folder as another kind of junk filter, and the messages will remain conveniently out of view. In order to ensure that it doesn’t inadvertently start mis-identifying messages as low priority, Microsoft is keen to stress that Clutter won’t do anything until it is confident it has a thorough understanding of your behaviors and your email preferences - for most people this will happen within a matter of days, depending on the volume of email you receive.

You’ll receive daily and weekly notifications so you’re aware which messages Clutter is moving, and don’t miss something important - significantly, these notifications are no longer sent as emails, since replacing an inbox-cluttering message with another one would seem to somewhat detract from Clutter’s purpose. If a message is wrongly picked up as low priority and moved to your Clutter folder, you can move it back to your inbox to be dealt with sooner, and Clutter will learn from the mistake in order to improve its handling of your messages in the future. In the same way, you can choose to proactively teach Clutter about your preferences by marking specific low-priority messages as Clutter.

According to Microsoft, Clutter already shifts more than a million low-priority messages daily, and saves its users almost an hour and a half in productivity each month - figures which are expected to rise as the tool is adopted more widely. If you’ve already enabled Clutter manually, or have enabled it but later switched it off, nothing will change; if you haven’t yet taken any action at all, it will be automatically turned on for you if it hasn’t been already. If you want to disable it, you can do so from the Options page of either Outlook on the Web or the Outlook 2016 Preview, or can simply click the turn it off link at the bottom of notifications.

Clutter gives you a highly personalized email filter that knows which messages are of interest. If you want to learn more about using Office 365 in your business, give us a call.

Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

June 11th, 2015

164_A_MacMost Mac users love the user-friendly, easy-to-navigate interface the Apple brand is known for. But did you know that using your Mac can be even easier? It’s hard to believe, but if you’ve never taken the time to get familiar with your system’s shortcuts, there are a few that are sure to save you hours of time in the long run and bring a new level of usability and ease to your beloved Mac.

Open Programs and Files Faster

Want a quicker way to open files and programs faster? If you’re tired of opening Finder and scrolling through the hundreds of applications and files you have stored, there is a much more efficient solution - Spotlight Search.

To use Spotlight Search, follow these steps:

  1. Press Command and the space bar to launch your search.
  2. Type the first few letters of the file or app you’d like to open.
  3. From the drop down menu that appears, scroll down to the app or file you’re searching for and hit the enter key.

Force Quit Apps

When the pinwheel of death rears its ugly head, your application stalls and your productivity comes to a standstill. There is no better time to make use of the Force Quit shortcut. Here’s how to do it.
  1. Press Command-Option-Esc to display the list of all applications that are running.
  2. From here simply choose the one you’d like to quit.

Take a Screenshot

Pictures speak a thousand words, and sometimes you may need an image of your display to more thoroughly communicate a message. Here are three easy ways to take a screenshot on your Mac OS.
  • Take a snapshot of your entire display - press Command-Shift-3.
  • Take a screenshot of any open window - press Command-Shift-4, followed by the space bar. Then, simply click on the window you’d like an image of.
  • Snap a customized image of your display - press Command-Shift-4. When the crosshairs appear, use them to drag a frame over the portion of the screen you’d like to capture.

Launch frequently used Apps, Files and Server Connections automatically

This trick allows you to save time by automatically launching a program when you log in. Follow these steps to do this:
  1. Go to System Preferences
  2. Choose Users & Groups
  3. Select your account
  4. Click on Login Items
  5. Use the plus and minus signs to add or remove programs, files, folders, etc. you’d like to automatically launch upon login
  6. Click Add to save
These are just a few of the dozens of shortcuts and features Mac OS has to offer. If you’d like to learn more or need other IT-related assistance, don’t hesitate to contact us.
Published with permission from TechAdvisory.org. Source.

Topic Apple Mac OS